Hummingbirds See Motion in an Unexpected Way

Hummingbirds See Motion in an Unexpected Way

Summary: Have you ever imagined what the world must look like to hummingbirds as they zoom about at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour? According to new evidence on the way the hummingbird brain processes visual signals you can’t. That’s because a key area of the hummingbird’s brain processes motion in a unique and unexpected way.

Have you ever imagined what the world must look like to hummingbirds as they zoom about at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour? According to new evidence on the way the hummingbird brain processes visual signals reported in Current Biology on January 5, you can’t. That’s because a key area of the hummingbird’s brain processes motion in a unique and unexpected way.

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Think Chicken: Think Intelligent, Caring & Complex

Review looks at studies on chicken intelligence, social development and emotions

Suummary: Chickens are not as clueless or ‘bird-brained’ as people believe them to be. They have distinct personalities and can outmaneuver one another. They know their place in the pecking order, and can reason by deduction, which is an ability that humans develop by the age of seven. Chicken intelligence is therefore unnecessarily underestimated and overshadowed by other avian groups.

Chickens are not as clueless or “bird-brained” as people believe them to be. They have distinct personalities and can outmaneuver one another. They know their place in the pecking order, and can reason by deduction, which is an ability that humans develop by the age of seven. Chicken intelligence is therefore unnecessarily underestimated and overshadowed by other avian groups. So says Lori Marino, senior scientist for The Someone Project, a joint venture of Farm Sanctuary and the Kimmela Center in the USA, who reviewed the latest research about the psychology, behavior and emotions of the world’s most abundant domestic animal. Her review is published in Springer’s journal Animal Cognition.

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Universe is Expanding Up To 9% Faster Than We Thought, Say Scientists

Earth and stars as seen from the International Space Station, 17 May 2016. Photograph: Nasa/Rex/Shutterstock

Earth and stars as seen from the International Space Station, 17 May 2016. Photograph: Nasa/Rex/Shutterstock

The universe is expanding faster than anyone had previously measured or calculated from theory. This is a discovery that could test part of Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, a pillar of cosmology that has withstood challenges for a century.

Nasa and the European Space Agency jointly announced the universe is expanding 5% to 9% faster than predicted, a finding they reached after using the Hubble space telescope to measure the distance to stars in 19 galaxies beyond theMilky Way.

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Zika Virus Case in Utah Raises New Questions for Scientists

Zika Virus Case in Utah Raises New Questions for Scientists

Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are scrambling to figure out how a Utah caregiver became ill with Zika.

The virus is overwhelmingly transmitted via bites from infected mosquitoes, but can also spread through sexual contact. The case in Utah seems to be the result of something completely different, however, say state officials. Scientists aren’t exactly sure how the person became infected, but they working to figure what’s behind this latest twist in the ongoing epidemic.

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Here’s How The World Could End And What We Can Do About It

In a dingy apartment building, insulated by layers of hanging rugs, the last family on Earth huddles around a fire, melting a pot of oxygen. Ripped from the sun’s warmth by a rogue dark star, the planet has been exiled to the cold outer reaches of the solar system. The lone clan of survivors must venture out into the endless night to harvest frozen atmospheric gases that have piled up like snow.

As end-of-humanity scenarios go, that bleak vision from Fritz Leiber’s 1951 short story “A Pail of Air” is a fairly remote possibility. Scholars who ponder such things think a self-induced catastrophe such as nuclear war or a bioengineered pandemic is most likely to do us in. However, a number of other extreme natural hazards—including threats from space and geologic upheavals here on Earth—could still derail life as we know it, unraveling advanced civilization, wiping out billions of people, or potentially even exterminating our species.

Yet there’s been surprisingly little research on the subject, says Anders Sandberg, a catastrophe researcher at the University of Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute in the United Kingdom. Last he checked, “there are more papers about dung beetle reproduction than human extinction,” he says. “We might have our priorities slightly wrong.”

Frequent, moderately severe disasters such as earthquakes attract far more funding than low-probability apocalyptic ones. Prejudice may also be at work; for instance, scientists who pioneered studies of asteroid and comet impacts complained about confronting a pervasive “giggle factor.” Consciously or unconsciously, Sandberg says, many researchers consider catastrophic risks the province of fiction or fantasy—not serious science.

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Text Parents About Homework to Boost Exam Results – Study

Researchers found efforts such as joining Scouts or exposure to classical music led to little or no impact on attainment

Texting parents about their children’s homework proved to be cheaper and more effective in improving exam results than a series of other efforts, including joining the Scouts, exposure to classical music or individual tuition over the internet, according to new research.

Trials funded by the Educational Endowment Foundation found no substance in a number of myths, with most of the studies showing little or no impact in terms of attainment even if several resulted in improved self-confidence and teamwork.

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Half Your Brain Stays Awake When You Sleep In A New Place

Sleeping Man - PsvpTamilHalf Your Brain Stays Awake When You Sleep In A New Place

There is a great chance that you felt sleepy and groggy after you slept in a hotel or went out to camp. You may have felt weary the following day after you tossed and turned in your bed the entire night. This is a result of nature dying hard. The brain goes into survival mode as someone sleeps in a new place. Scientists at Brown University have suggested that this enables people to jump awake once strange sounds arise.

The scientists referred to the First Night Effect (FNE) as a usual disturbance in sleep for a while. However, they have been unable to completely understand how this process exactly works. Masako Tamaki teamed up with her colleagues in order to discover the reason behind this concept. They meticulously analyzed multiple sleeping brains with the help of advanced Neuroimaging techniques. Interestingly, they discovered that such brains demonstrate asymmetrical patterns of sleep activity. This means that a hemisphere of the brain continues to hum as the other one is asleep. The hemisphere that is not fully awake tends to be more active, so much so that it responds to external stimuli such as deviant sounds.

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All in Einstein’s Head

Albert Einstein - PsvpTamilHow Einstein’s creative thinking led to a new rule book for the universe.

Who could have believed that the world was flat? Or that it sits fixed in space, while the cosmos revolves around it? Anyone with two eyes, that’s who. It takes a leap of imagination to contemplate the alternative — that we are standing atop a rapidly spinning sphere, hurtling through space.

Albert Einstein, like Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei before him, redefined our understanding of the universe, and he did so thanks to a knack for keeping his thoughts clear of unnecessary information. In fact, he conducted experiments on the basis of thought alone, playing them out in something like the construct from The Matrix — a completely empty space populated with only items essential to his experiments. A clock. A train. A beam of light. An observer or two. An elevator. “Imagine a large portion of empty space, so far removed from stars and other appreciable masses,” said Einstein, describing his mental construct.

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Electric Eels Can Kill Horses, New Research Confirms

Electric Eel Fish - PsvpTamilExperiments at Vanderbilt University have proven a 200-year-old observation that electric eels can leap out of water and shock animals to death, a claim originally made by 19th century biologist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt.

During a field trip to the Amazon basin in 1800, Humboldt said he saw electric eels leaping out of the water and delivering enough voltage to kill a horse. But with no scientific studies on the matter, and no similar observations since, many had come to believe that the famous naturalist was exaggerating.

“The first time I read von Humboldt’s tale, I thought it was completely bizarre,” said Ken Catania, the Stevenson Professor of Biological Sciences at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tennessee, where the recent experiments were conducted. “Why would the eels attack the horses instead of swimming away?”

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14 Things Dads Can Do To Show Their Daughters They Love Them

Whatever your love language may be, here are fourteen things dads can do to show their daughters they love them:
1. Love her mother
If there is one thing you take away from this list I hope it is this: love your daughter’s mother. When a father shows devotion to his wife, he is ultimately showing his daughter what she should be looking for in a man. Fathers who live up to their role in a marriage, are creating an expectation and security blanket for their daughters to admire and seek after in their own future relationships.

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